Category Archives: Beelden

De Wachter

De Wachter (The Guardian) at Nassauplein, The Hague. Created by Knight in The Order of the Netherlands Lion and Officer in the Order of Oranje-Nassau: Shinkichi Tajiri. Presented on the occasion of the abolishing of conscription by interest groups AVNM and VVDM on August 31, 1996.

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Johan de Witt

Johan de Witt Statue of Johan de Witt at Buitenhof, The Hague. Made by Fre Jeltsema in 1916.

Johan de Witt (Dordrecht, September 24, 1625 – The Hague, August 20, 1672), lord of Zuid and Noord Linschoten Snelrewaard, Hekendorp and IJsselmeer Vere, was nineteen years pensionary of the county of Holland in the Golden Age and therefore the most important politician of the Dutch Republic.

He was also a gifted mathematician, who is considered one of the founders of insurance mathematics. Johan was, together with his brother Cornelis, murdered and cruelly maimed by Orangists. The murder is one of the most memorable in national history.

Corbulo

Corbulo was born in Italy into a senatorial family. His father, who shared the same name, entered the senate as a formal praetor under Tiberius. His mother Vistilia came from a family which held the praetorship.

Corbulo

After Caligula’s assassination, Corbulo’s career came to a halt until, in 47 AD, the new Emperor Claudius made him commander of the armies in Germania Inferior, with base camp in Colonia (Cologne).

The new assignment was a difficult one and Corbulo had to deal with major rebellions by the Germanic Cherusci and Chauci. During his stay in Germania, the general ordered the construction of a canal between the rivers Rhine and Meuse. Parts of this engineering work, known as Fossa Corbulonis or Corbulo’s Canal, have been found at archeological digs. Its course is about identical to the Vliet, which connects the modern towns of Leiden (ancient Matilo) and Voorburg (Forum Hadriani).

Statue of Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo, Prins Bernhardlaan, Voorburg.

Statue of Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo, Prins Bernhardlaan, Voorburg.

After two failed plots by noblemen and senators, including Corbulo’s son-in-law, Senator Lucius Annius Vinicianus, to overthrow Nero in 62, he became suspicious of Corbulo and his support among the Roman masses. In 67 disturbances broke out in Judaea and Nero, ordering Vespasian to take command of the Roman forces, summoned Corbulo, as well as two brothers who were the governors of Upper and Lower Germany, to Greece. On his arrival at Cenchreae, the port of Corinth, messengers from Nero met Corbulo, and ordered him to commit suicide, which he loyally obeyed by falling on his own sword, saying, “Axios!”.

De Grote Kerk

Grote of Sint-Jacobskerk, Great, or St. James Church) is a landmark Protestant church in The Hague, Netherlands. The building is located on the Torenstraat, named for its high tower. Together with the Binnenhof, it is one of the oldest buildings in The Hague. Members of the House of Orange-Nassau have been baptised there. The latest are Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands and his daughter Catharina-Amalia, Princess of Orange.

The Grote or Sint-Jacobskerk.

The Grote or Sint-Jacobskerk.

It is remarkable for its fine tower and chime of bells, and contains the cenotaph monument of Jacob van Wassenaer Obdam, designed by Cornelis Moninckx and sculpted by Bartholomeus Eggers in 1667, and the renaissance tomb of Gerrit van Assendelft (1487 – 1558).

Monument of Jacob van Wassenaer Obdam.

Monument of Jacob van Wassenaer Obdam.

The church endured a fire in 1539, and the stained glass windows were repaired by leading glass artists, including the brothers Dirk and Wouter Crabeth of Gouda. Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, who visited the church after the fire, sponsored two windows by the Crabeth’s that due to their royal origin are the only two windows that have survived up to the present day.

Stained glass window to commemorate the martyr Jan de Bakker, designed by Max Nauta, executed by glaziers 'Schrier en De Ru' in Haarlem, 1930.

Stained glass window to commemorate the martyr Jan de Bakker, designed by Max Nauta, executed by glaziers ‘Schrier en De Ru’ in Haarlem, 1930.

Statue.

Statue.

Organ.

Organ.

Statue.

Statue.

Painting.

Painting.

Onze Lieve Vrouw Onbevlekt Ontvangen

Church at Elandstraat.

Onze Lieve Vrouw Onbevlekt Ontvangen kerk

The establishment of this parish in the Zeeheldenbuurt at The Hague was necessary at the end of the nineteenth century, because the city was extended in a northwesterly direction. Designed by architect Miller in 1892 the church was built at Elandstraat. On 1 December 1892, the new church was consecrated.

In 1905 and 1906, the Franssen brothers from Roermond built a new organ in the church. In the course of the years some changes has been made to the organ. After the restoration of the church in 1996, it was decided to restore the organ by ‘Adema’s organ building’ from Hillegom. On Sunday, May 15, 2011, the restored Franssen organ was festively inaugurated.

The church is generally considered as the main work of Nicholas Miller. It is a large neo-Gothic church tower with double front, cloverleaf shaped transept and choir. Stylistically it is entirely derived from the early Gothic architecture in northern France and the late Romanesque architecture in the German Rhineland.

Church at Elandstraat, The Hague.

Onze Lieve Vrouw Onbevlekt Ontvangen church at Elandstraat, The Hague.

Monuments

Hundred followers! Thank you artist, photographers, writers and reporters all over the world for all the comments, likes and inspiration. You have turned a depressed man into a fanatic and proud photographer enjoying life again.

Next Sunday, my first exhibition at Theater Dakota, The Hague since 23 years.

Onafhankelijkheidsmonument, Plein 1813, The Hague

Onafhankelijkheidsmonument, Plein 1813, The Hague

PTT monument, Nassauplein.

PTT monument at Nassauplein, The Hague.